Something You Do When You Practice That Is Always A Good Use Of Your Time

If you practice patience in one moment of anger, you will escape one hundred days of sorrow. -Chinese Proverb Serious, daily musical practice is something that is loaded with speculation and second-guessing. Lots of “should’ve, would’ve and could’ve”, as my father would say. Whenever I’m giving a practice coaching session to a musician, the topic […]

Teaching And Learning Music: A Built-In Problem In Exhanging Information

The longer I teach the Alexander Technique to musicians, the more frequently one particular issue arises: the lack of clarity between cause and effect where practice and technique are concerned. Below is a brilliant description of this potential obstacle to progress: The players/teachers do what they do; they tell the student what they think they […]

Optimizing Practice: Habit Versus Choice

After teaching the Alexander Technique to musicians for a number of years now, one thing I can assert with confidence is that there’s never such thing as a “typical” lesson. In fact, I usually have no idea what I’ll be working on with my student at the beginning of a lesson. My only agenda is […]

Practicing Music: There Are No Foolproof Exercises

Musicians love to share advice in an attempt to help other musicians. (I’m no exception.) And it probably goes without saying that some of the advice is helpful, and some isn’t. One of the most common forms of advice that I often take issue with is when a musician blindly prescribes a particular exercise to another musician […]

Standing And Sitting To Play Music: Two Important Mechanical Principles

Practically without exception whenever I give a musician an Alexander Technique lesson, I witness habits of imbalance and tension in the acts of sitting and standing that sharply impact the musician’s coordination, comfort and sense of control and satisfaction. Because they are so deeply ingrained, the sensations of these habits fall below the kinesthetic “radar” […]