Standing And Sitting To Play Music: Two Important Mechanical Principles

Practically without exception whenever I give a musician an Alexander Technique lesson, I witness habits of imbalance and tension in the acts of sitting and standing that sharply impact the musician’s coordination, comfort and sense of control and satisfaction. Because they are so deeply ingrained, the sensations of these habits fall below the kinesthetic “radar” […]

Six Quotes About Learning (And Unlearning) That Inform My Teaching And Practice

Everything that I write on this blog, whether it’s about practicing more efficiently, improvising with greater skill and expression, or about how to avoid injury and strain, is based largely upon the ideas of a person who didn’t even play music. Yet his ideas continue to serve me well, both in helping me to help […]

Body Awareness And Music Making: Learning To Reinterpret Your Senses

One of the aims (and benefits) of studying the Alexander Technique is an improved sense of awareness. Without exception, my students gain measurable improvements, not only in their kinesthetic (body) awareness, but also, in their overall awareness through their other senses, as they play music. They learn to hear more vividly, perceive time more accurately, […]

Three Misconceptions About Your Hands That Might Be Holding You Back

Many musicians who come to me for Alexander Technique lessons do so because they have problems with their hands: chronic pain and/or coordination issues (these two can be very closely related). Medical conditions like carpal tunnel syndrome and elbow tendonitis, as well as general discomfort and fatigue when playing can be, are often caused (or […]

Fitness And Exercise For Musicians: Choose Wisely

As someone who not only practices music daily, but also, engages in physical fitness activities on a regular basis, I firmly believe that your fitness has an impact upon your music making. It’s not as if you can’t play well if you’re not physically fit (lots of very unfit virtuosi out there). It’s just that […]